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Apple’s next moves invite madness without clarity

Apple LogoSomething is brewing. If you read technology blogs, you’ll have been inundated with talk of what’s coming. Unlike any other company, promise of changes in Apple’s product line always seem to get people talking. It’s a fascinating dichotomy: Everyone seems to know what’s coming next (often representing it as truth), yet Apple is one of the most secretive companies on the planet. Often I’m told “The new iPhone is going to have this feature”, as if they forgot to read the “rumor” part of news. News stories will even omit the fictional nature of Apple coverage when stories appear plausible. While it is human nature to anticipate, it perhaps is more like humans to take fiction and make it fact.

Right now, all sort of ideas are floating around about an event pegged for September, 2013:

1. The event will happen on September 10th

2. Apple will introduce a low-cost iPhone (named iPhone 5C)
– Without Siri
– Costing $300
– All sorts of colors will be available

3. Apple will introduce a new iPhone (named iPhone 5S)
– With a fingerprint scanner
– A gold version will be offered in addition to black and white
– With a new, second flash
– With a faster CPU and more memory
– With iOS7

Contrast that with what is actually known from official sources (and past experience):

1. Apple tends to run events in September and October to announce new products. There is no reason to think Apple will change that. The exact date of an event hasn’t been announced.

2. iOS7 was announced at Apple’s WWDC event in June, leading to a logical assumption that they’ll offer an upgraded phone to ft the new operating system. Apple has a history of announcing a new iPhone each year and has announced its last two iPhones in October and September. A new phone next month is a no-brainer.

3. Apple tends to alternate names from “#” to “#S”, then back to a new, larger “#”. Given that, we should expect an iPhone 5S.

4. Announcements generally offer product specification upgrades. It seems plausible Apple’s Macbook Pro product line will see upgrades.

None of the other reported details are based on anything but rumors, past patent filings, or chatter from non-Apple sources. While it is clear that we might might benefit from a deep breath and reality – this kind of anticipation is fun and interesting. At times I’m asked “Imagine if the phone had this feature, what would that be like?”. But, this also favors Apple in a big way. The fact that some many people talk and write about what’s coming, guarantees that Apple needs little or no advertising. If Apple’s next event does happen on September 10th, you can be sure that we’ll be covering it here on Blogging Calwell. You’re welcome, Apple.