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TAG: Microsoft Outlook

Update Windows 8, Get Outlook 2013 RT

Outlook 2013If you update Windows 8 to Windows 8.1, Microsoft is also going to give you Outlook 2013 RT. In the post they also say:

Outlook 2013 RT will be available on Windows RT tablets as part of the free Windows 8.1 update coming later this year.

Incredible news for users; but even more, Microsoft has to be the only company with the balls to offer a full productivity application in an Operating System update. I see that process backfiring when the time comes for support calls. Users today are unnecessarily hooked on Outlook’s interface (which is why a Metro version of it would never work).

First Impressions: Microsoft Outlook 2013

Outlook2013-1Office on Windows is a Microsoft cash cow. When a new version is released, lots of people take notice. On October 11, 2012, Microsoft released the 2013 version of the Office group of applications on Windows. There are a number applications to look at in the package, but today, I wanted to focus on Outlook. The Outlook mail application has existed in a number of incarnations since the early 1990’s when it was included in copies of Microsoft Exchange. The application has had to contend with a number of major computing shifts while eMail has essentially stayed the same. Today, I take a look at what’s new and notable in Outlook 2013.

Outlook PST Files Should Not Be So Difficult To Work With, Still

Outlook07-LogoOh Microsoft, in February of 2010 you released the (now legendary) piece of documentation called the “Outlook Personal Folders (.pst) File Format“. In that you described the Personal Folders File format in glorious detail. Details that only a programmer or a Uber-Geek would love. When this came out I thought that we would usher in a new era of tools and interoperability on all platforms. We would see the end of all this hard-to-reach-data sitting in far flung PST files that most users wouldn’t be able to access. See, I’ve written often about Outlook and PST files. I want to see a day that users could open up PST files on a Windows computer like they might open a text file. Well, sadly, that day is not here yet.

Blogs Of The Past: Free Microsoft Outlook Alternatives

When I wrote this article in February of 2004, the email client landscape was bare and ready for a shake-up.  Just two mere months later Google would offer the invitation-only Gmail beta that would stay in beta for more than two years. In this small sliver of time, I would attempt to take a good look at email clients in the age of servers running POP3 and IMAP for access. Also, at this time you couldn’t use POP3 for most of your free mail accounts (such as Hotmail). As always, I’ll look at my previous work through a, older, and possibly wiser lens while you marvel in watching my path of self-discovery.

Recovering data from Outlook OST files

Outlook07-LogoOne sort of Voodoo reserved for IT guys is the recovery of certain types of mail data. Outlook keeps mail data in two types of files – the PST (Personal Storage) file and the OST (Offline Storage) file. If you look to Microsoft for the “Official” word on getting mail data out of the OST file, you’ll be met with “not possible” or “not supported” or some version of those words. In the world of IT, when you need to get at user’s mail data – “not possible” is not going to cut it. Here’s how you can get some (or all) the mail data out of OST files.

The Case for a Free Outlook 2010

Microsoft Outlook 2007 LogoNow, now – don’t go throwing your hands in the air all at once. I’m not going crazy over one of Microsoft’s flagship products. I don’t hate Microsoft. I actually like them, I have been working with the products for more than ten years now and have built a company around support most of the products they offer. I wouldn’t call myself an evangelist – but it is clear that the continued success of Microsoft is going to be tied to my own company’s success. Microsoft seems to be at a real crossroads with their flagship product: Office. The recent fighting, twitter movement, and protests over the support of HTML in Outlook 2010 had me thinking what Microsoft would need to do to set themselves apart and really do something special. Microsoft needs to offer Outlook 2010 (Without Word HTML rendering) for free when they release the 2010 version of their Office product.

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