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CATEGORY: review

Windows 8: A Closer Look At Metro

When the Interface for Windows 8 was announced, I was a little surprised at first. Was this new phone-looking interface going to work very well with existing Business PCs? Was this new interface going to be removable? What kind of subsystem would Metro be running under? Well, as previews of Windows 8 continued to roll out – it became clear that metro was going to be forced into the next version of Windows and that there may (possibly?) be a way to disable the interface. Join me as a I take a closer look at Metro and the ramifications for IT Departments all over.

eReader Review: Kobo Vox

Vox-1The Android operating system is everywhere. Android is popping up on so many different devices that it’s only natural to see it on eReaders too. In this case, the $199 (cdn) Kobo Vox sold here in Canada by Chapters and Indigo stores. This eReader is the new color model that complements two other black and white devices. Full current specs of this device can be found here. The Kobo itself is a 7-inch fringe field switching (FFS+) LCD screen and android 2.3.3 with WiFi b/g/n access for access to the Indigo eBooks library. What did I think of this device after checking it out? Read on for my impressions.

Review: Google’s Music Service – Is The Cloud Ready Ror Music? [Updated]

You can imagine my delight, as I’m watching Techcrunch Disrupt, to get an invitation to join Google music. Indeed, I would love too. Google’s Music service (currently in beta) is billed as a cloud-based music storage location that also doubles as a player, music sharing service and playlist maker. The catch, however, was that Google Music is not currently available in Canada. That didn’t stop me. Let’s take a look at this new service.

Review: Sony eBook Reader PRS-650

After having an iPad and writing about it a number of times and ultimately writing about why I sold it – I had managed to spend allot of time understanding how I wanted to read eBooks. While reading eBooks was a great experience on the iPad – reading PDF files such as online printouts and magazines – was even more amazing. After this, however, I was looking for a new way to read, one that would not use a back-lit or illuminated screen. This lead me to the eReader product offered by Sony, the PRS-650. Here are my thoughts.

Android-x86 On A Netbook, Is It Ready? A Review.

android x86The recent flood of Android-based smartphones and tablets is starting to really pay off for Google. Thanks to this, we are seeing a large number of devices that may not exactly fit the Android use-case, but are nonetheless interesting. I have recently been very interested in the Android tablet and/or Netbook scenario. Why is this more interesting than ChromeOS or some other Operating System? Android has a much more streamlined use, it’s much faster than that its Windows counterpart, and since ChromeOS isn’t exactly ready today – some may turn to Android. But, is it ready? How well does it work? I will install Android on an older Acer Aspire One netbook to see how well it runs over Windows XP.

First Impressions – Office 2010 Starter

Gone from OEM and newly installed computers is the “ugly-duckling” Microsoft Works application. Enter it’s replacement – Office 2010 Starter Edition. The Starter Edition of Office is intended to be installed on New and OEM computers and is ad-supported. This copy of Office is intended for free use and only includes limited-feature copies of Microsoft Word 2010 and Microsoft Excel 2010. It will run only on Vista SP1 and Windows – with no support for Windows XP.

See My complete Office Starter 2010 Edition Gallery here

First Impressions – Soluto [Updated]

Soluto Logo(re?) Introduced at TechCrunch DisruptSoluto was one of the big stars of the conference. There’s a good chance it will win the big prize at Disrupt 2010. What Soluto intends to do is allow the user to focus on the boot process, identify what applications are slowing down a computer and then let the user improve this by disabling certain items. Soluto has also embarked on creating what’s called the PC Genome which looks to map problems and solutions in a large database allowing for future streamlining of the solution process.

A look at Brizzly – filtering the noise for a better Twitter experience

One of the bigger trends of the social web space has to be the ability to “filter” the stream of data. We’re getting too much data from services like Twitter and Facebook to get meaningful use out of it.

I’ll give you an example of this problem. You’re away from Twitter for a few hours and you come back to using your favorite application to read tweets. You find that the movie star you follow has decided to “live-tweet” his experiences at the newest award show he/she is attending. This is great, but it produces upwards of 30 tweets in a very short timeframe – stuck in-between those tweets is one from your best friend mentioning that they’re taking a road trip to the cottage. What can happen in the process is the tweet you might want to see could get lost in the noise.

First Impressions: Blackberry 8330 CDMA

Device: Blackberry 8330 “Curve”
Previous Device: Blackberry 8703
Provider: Bell
Base Price: $549.00

I’ve had this smart phone now for a day and so far I’m pleased with the new features and annoyed with some others.

Welcome to this new device are features like a camera, a gps device and the inclusion of media players as well as memory expandability. Some features not so welcome are the new keyboard layout, removal of the spinning wheel and addition of the track ball. Along the way, some unexpected surprises.